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Monday, February 20, 2017

I NEED TO GO BACK TO LA RIGHT NOW

No kidding.

TUNDRA SWAN!
YELLOW-FOOTED GULL!
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL!
DUSKY-CAPPED FLYCATCHER!
CAPE MAY WARBLER!
SCOTT'S ORIOLE!

ALL I HAVEN'T SEEN YET...please don't go birds, stay there until I get back! That's 25th..lol.


Tundra Swan (Cygnus columbianus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 12:43 by Mark Scheel
- Pierce College, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.1820567,-118.5755253&ll=34.1820567,-118.5755253
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34597455
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Continuing. In easternmost agricultural field south of El Rancho Dr.   Two fields south of El Rancho Dr.,  south of covered area with hay bales. Hanging out with Canada Geese. Photos."

Yellow-footed Gull (Larus livens) (1)
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 16:05 by Curtis Marantz
- Rio Hondo Coastal Spreading Grounds, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9958925,-118.0994654&ll=33.9958925,-118.0994654
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34603085
- Comments: "This was a large, heavy-bodied gull that differed little from the adult Western Gulls in its size, structure, and plumage patterns.  Although the bill stood out as larger, and even more obviously, stouter than those of at least most of the Western Gulls, I am not sure it would have been separable from the largest-billed individuals in the flock.  The culmen was straight until curving downward near the tip, and the angle at the gonys appeared to be relatively weak because the bill was stout throughout its length.  This bird's bill may have been a little longer than those of the Western Gulls, but my impression was that the greatest difference between the two species was and how stout this bird's bill appeared.  This bird seemed to have a proportionately larger head than did those of the other birds, but I suspect the sloping forehead, gently rounded crown, and the angular junction of the crown with the forehead and the more sharply rounded junction with the crown and the nape were indicative of this bird being a male.  Apart from the subtle, structural differences in the bill and head, this bird appeared essentially like a large Western Gull.  The neck was short and stout, the body was plump, the wings appeared to be relatively short, and the tail was short and squared-tipped.  I saw the tips of four primaries extending beyond the tertials in a tapered wingtip that extended just beyond the tip of the tail.  As I recall, the primary projection was only slightly longer than the exposed tertials.  The tail was less than one-half the length of the body without the head and neck.  I saw the legs and feet only briefly, yet I noted that the legs were relatively short and that the feet were fully webbed.
This bird's plumage patterns were essentially identical to those of the Western Gulls.  The head, neck, breast, sides, flanks, and what I could see of the belly and undertail coverts were snow-white and completely unmarked, with no suggestion whatsoever of streaking on the face, crown, or back or sides of the neck.  I also noted that the rump and tail were entirely white and unmarked.  Contrasting with the white of the head, neck, and underparts, the back, scapulars, wing coverts, and tertials were a slate-gray in color.  The only pattern that I noted on these regions resulted from broad, white tips to the rear scapulars, which produced a conspicuous scapular-crescent, and equally broad tips of white to the tertials that produced a tertial-crescent that was at least as broad as those of the Western Gulls at the extreme end of the range for this character.  The exposed primary tips were black, but the four primaries evident on the upperside of the closed wing each had a small, white spot at the tip.  When the bird spread the wing slightly, I further noted that the next primary inward had a similar tip that was presumably covered by the tertials in the fully closed wing.  Further evident on the far wing as seen from below was a relatively small, white mirror near the tip of the longest primary visible on the underside of the wing; however, I saw little or no additional marking on the underside of the wing.  My views of the spread wing were brief, but what I could see appeared to represent white tips to the secondaries that produced a band along the trailing edge of the wing, and mostly white underwings that contrasted with the dusky undersides of at least the primaries.
The bill was a deep-yellow in color with a rounded spot of red near the tip of the lower mandible.  Given our distance from this bird, it was difficult to discern the color of the eyes, but they did not appear quite as dark as those of at least some of the Western Gulls, and it was relatively certain that I saw a yellow orbital-ring.  It was only when this bird raised up as it was bathing, and once when it almost rolled over onto its back, that it revealed that both the legs and webbed feet were a chrome-yellow in color."

Yellow-footed Gull (Larus livens) (1)
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 13:38 by Matthew Grube
- Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9954388,-118.0951416&ll=33.9954388,-118.0951416
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34596421
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Located today by Matt Grube. South of Washington Ave. It moved between the dike and the water and several times showed it's deep yellow legs and feet. Legs were quite thick.  Significantly thicker bill than Westerns with larger red spot on lower mandible."

Yellow-footed Gull (Larus livens) (1)
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 13:38 by Roger Woodruff
- Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9954388,-118.0951416&ll=33.9954388,-118.0951416
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34596420
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Located today by Matt Grube. South of Washington Ave. It moved between the dike and the water and several times showed it's deep yellow legs and feet. Legs were quite thick.  Significantly thicker bill than Westerns with larger red spot on lower mandible. "

Yellow-footed Gull (Larus livens) (1)
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 13:38 by Michael Woodruff
- Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9954388,-118.0951416&ll=33.9954388,-118.0951416
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34596385
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Located today by Matt Grube. South of Washington Ave. It moved between the dike and the water and several times showed it's deep yellow legs and feet. Legs were quite thick.  Significantly thicker bill than Westerns with larger red spot on lower mandible."

Yellow-footed Gull (Larus livens) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 12:56 by Kimball Garrett
- Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9954388,-118.0951416&ll=33.9954388,-118.0951416
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34598456
- Comments: "Adult first located on the west bank by Matt Grube and well-studied by all of us. Virtually identical to nearby adult Western Gulls in mantle color and size (but certainly at the large end of male Westerns), but with deep yellow legs and feet. This yellow color extended to the webs on the toes, and there was no hint of pink on the webbing or around the tarsal joint. The legs appeared thicker than the legs of the largest Western Gulls.  Bill color similar to Westerns, though the red spot on the gonys looked a bit brighter and larger; however, the bill was on the long side and noticeably thicker than the bills of any Westerns (enough so that we could pick out the swimming bird on the water even when the legs were not visible). The bird stood and flushed from the west dike, circled, and landed on the water, and we were able to follow it on the water for a long time until it took flight again and landed atop the west bank."

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus) (1)
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 13:38 by Michael Woodruff
- Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9954388,-118.0951416&ll=33.9954388,-118.0951416
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34596385
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Immature, likely one of the birds that have been in the area.  Curtis spotted it at the end, just before we left."

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus) (1)
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 13:38 by Matthew Grube
- Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9954388,-118.0951416&ll=33.9954388,-118.0951416
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34596421
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Immature, likely one of the birds that have been in the area."

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus) (1)
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 13:38 by Roger Woodruff
- Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9954388,-118.0951416&ll=33.9954388,-118.0951416
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34596420
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Immature, likely one of the birds that have been in the area. "

Slaty-backed Gull (Larus schistisagus) (1)
- Reported Feb 19, 2017 08:10 by Bernardo Alps
- LB - Junipero Beach, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.7638218,-118.1808414&ll=33.7638218,-118.1808414
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34593384
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Larger than nearby WEGU and GWGU. Bill appeared very large (long) in the photos. Eyes strikingly pale. Legs bluish pink, like GWGU rather than pinkish pink like WEGU. Standing in puddled water among hundreds of other gulls near the end of the beach at Shoreline Dr."

Dusky-capped Flycatcher (Myiarchus tuberculifer) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 13:06 by Manuel Duran
- stakeout Dusky-capped Flycatcher, La Mirada (2008-2016), Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9174916,-118.0066904&ll=33.9174916,-118.0066904
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34589559
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Seen at 3:15 pm in the eucalyptus trees. Heard at least 5 different times earlier.  For the most part of the time we were there we heard it in the residential area in the northeast end."

Dusky-capped Flycatcher (Myiarchus tuberculifer) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 13:06 by Alejandra Cedillo
- stakeout Dusky-capped Flycatcher, La Mirada (2008-2016), Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9174916,-118.0066904&ll=33.9174916,-118.0066904
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34604467
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Seen at 3:15 pm in the eucalyptus trees. Heard at least 5 different times earlier.  For the most part of the time we were there we heard it in the residential area in the northeast end."

Dusky-capped Flycatcher (Myiarchus tuberculifer) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 13:05 by dessi sieburth
- stakeout Dusky-capped Flycatcher, La Mirada (2008-2016), Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9174916,-118.0066904&ll=33.9174916,-118.0066904
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34592397
- Comments: "continuing bird. Heard only, first heard call 3 times at 1:25 p.m. From the eucs along Las Flores Ave, near where the residential area ends. Then heard call again at 2:25 P.M in the eucs up the hill where the residential neighborhood ends. Call was a plain, down slurred whistle."

Dusky-capped Flycatcher (Myiarchus tuberculifer) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 10:46 by Chris Dean
- stakeout Dusky-capped Flycatcher, La Mirada (2008-2016), Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9174916,-118.0066904&ll=33.9174916,-118.0066904
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34592735
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Found continuing bird in trees along fence line. Dark gray head, pale gray throat, yellow belly, thick black bill, brownish back and hint of red in wings and tail. Plaintive call led me to the bird. Multiple photos."

Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina) (1)
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 16:45 by Brad Rumble
- Echo Park, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.0743105,-118.2607627&ll=34.0743105,-118.2607627
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34601892
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "possibly an immature female; note lack of eyering and throat patch, and the presence of the speckles across the chest; bill shape is long and thin; this bird did not vocalize; it was in a palm tree at the edge of the lawn north adjacent of the main fountains of the lake"

Scott's Oriole (Icterus parisorum) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 20, 2017 11:45 by K D
- Frank G. Bonelli Regional Park--north, Los Angeles, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.0921622,-117.8010347&ll=34.0921622,-117.8010347
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34593320
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Black head, black extends down back then yellow to base of black tail, black breast. Bird flew from tree to hillside bushes then lost sight of it.  Bird was viewed in tree on hillside across Puddingstone Drive...viewed/photos from Group Picnic Area #4 facing north."

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